Battle of Plassey

Palashi is a small village on the banks of the Bhagirathi river, 25 km south of Murshidabad, and 150 km from Kolkata. It derives its name from a bright red flowering tree, also known as Flame of the Forest. Read More.. It was June 23, 1757 when a battle changed the face of India. On that day the forces of Siraj-Ud-Daulah, Nawab of Bengal, clashed with troops of the British East India Company led by Robert Clive. At the end of that fight, the British rule was set in motion in Bengal. This battle is called Battle of Plassey. Read Less..

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The Indian Mutiny of 1857

British officers and the Indian rankers in the East India Company in Bengal Army entered a phase of extremely sour relations as many indians realized that the British were trying to destroy the traditions and customs of Indian society. This was a view shared by the sepoys of the Bengal Army, a substantial number of whom were high-caste Brahmins. Discipline, administration and command in the Bengal Army had for some time been inferior to that in the Company’s other two armies and matters were brought to a head by the introduction of the Pattern 1853 Enfield Rifle. Read More..
Indian sepoys were not ready to use cartridges made with pig and cow fat, thus offending both. In February 1857, the 19th (Bengal Native) Infantry refused to use the cartridges. Similar events were triggered through central and northern India. It was the start of Indian Mutiny... Read Less..

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History of Cricket

Cricket marked its entry in the sports performing area as early as the 13th century as a game in which country boys bowled at a tree stump or at the hurdle gate into a sheep small fenced-in area. This gate consisted of two uprights and a crossbar resting on the slotted tops; the crossbar was called a bail and the whole gate a wicket. Read More..
The fact that the bail could be removed (from being stuck) when the wicket was struck made this better than the stump, which name was later applied to the hurdle uprights. Early books differ about the size of the wicket, which bought/owned/received a third stump in the 1770s, but by 1706 the pitch--the area between the wickets--was 22 yards long.
The ball, once probably a stone, has remained much the same since the 17th century. Its modern weight of between 5.5 and 5.75 ounces (156 and 163 grams) was established in 1774. Read Less..

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What is Taumatawhakatangihangak oauauotamateaturipukaka pikimaungahoronukupokaiwhe nua kitanatahu?

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“Taumatawhakatangihangak oauauotamateaturipukaka pikimaungahoronukupokaiwhe nua kitanatahu” (85 letters) is the second longest geographical name that is accepted in the world which is a hill in New Zealand – it is a maori phrase which translates to “place where Tamatea, the man with the big knees, who slid, climbed and swallowed mountains, known as land-eater, played his flute to his loved one”. It was the longest until recently (though the Guinness Book of Records still regards it as the longest); it has most likely now been supplanted by Krung thep maha nakorn amorn ratana kosinmahintar ayutthay amaha dilok phop noppa ratrajathani burirom udom rajaniwesmahasat harn amorn phimarn avatarn sathit sakkattiya visanukamprasit in Thailand (163 letters). Read Less..

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